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Alley.jpg

Sanborn 1905 Fire Insurance Map

Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division, Sanborn Maps Collection

 

     The town of Lewisburg was first laid out in 1782 and consisted of 64 one-half acre lots arranged in a grid of 4 blocks E-W by 4 blocks N-S. Theses blocks, each with four lots, were separated by streets (Court, Jefferson and Lafayette running N-S and Randolph, Washington, and German (now Foster) running E-W), but there were no streets at the boundaries of the town. On the northeast edge of town, an alley ran east from Lafayette St., past lots 13 and 14, and up the hill to Lee St. The 1905 Sanborn fire insurance map shows the alley giving access to landlocked Lot 14 and the ones to the north of the alley towards Chestnut St. That road must not have been a town road since it does not exist today and the areas where the alley had been are now part of adjoining parcels.

 

Several 19th century deeds refer to the road or alley in describing lot lines:

  • In 1833, John Simpkins buys a lot “. . . leaving a 10' alley . . “ (Deed 12-600);

  • 3 years later he sells a lot (Deed 13-596) to Patrick Beirne that “. . . begins at the Tan house & runs up the hill with the alley to its termination . . “

  • In 1872, James Withrow sells H.W. Donnally part of the Simpkins tannery lot “. . . in the line of the street running past the stable of Thomas Pare . . . ” (Deed 27-143)

  • In 1910, the Worsham Stable Lot is sold (Deed 80-566) “. . . begins at the Tan house & runs up the hill with the alley to its termination . . .”

 

The only remaining evidence of that alley is the driveway going down the hill along the north side of the Thomas Pare House (Walking Tour #25). It provides access to the apartment building below the House.

 

Deeds are identified by (book no. – page no.) and are on file in the County Clerk's office at the Greenbrier County Courthouse.

 

     Special thanks are extended to the North House Museum Archives staff of the Greenbrier County Historical Society for their assistance in researching  the archives of the Greenbrier Independent newspaper, first published in 1852.

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